“nAmore” – Seaside in Montenegro and Croatia

Yeah, I swimmed there… Hate me.

On the boat crossing the Kotor bay

Last week I spent 4 days in the seaside (na more, in serbian). I just bought my bus ticket to Herceg Novi 3 hours before departuring and I did not have any room booked or friends there. Anyway as soon as got off the bus after a 13-hour trip (and leaving my mp3 in my seat to keep travelling without me… ) I was offered a cheap room where I stayed for two days. I left my stuff, said hello to the nice bugs who were going to share the house with me and went to enjoy the city center.

Although the sun was burning I enjoyed the beautiful sights and it didn’ t take me long until I went for my first swim in Crna Gora. I spent most of the day in the beach but I went for a long nap until I went out to check out the nightlife in Herceg Novi. Next day I went to Dubrovnik, which I enjoyed and came back to Herceg Novi to sleep. I contacted then some friend who were staying near Petrovac and stayed with them for a short time since I had to go back to Belgrade on Friday evening.

I have to admit that I fell in love with the seaside of Montenegro and Croatia and I can’ t wait to go back there. It was a happy discovering seeing how the seaside is not too exploited. It reminded me of the Andalusian seaside before our particular building-armaggedon in the 60′ s. God forbid the Russians (or whoever has intentions to build there) to not destroy the natural beauty of the ex-Yugoslavian seaside.

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Squatters in Molerova – Survival Guide

Last week my lovely-as-much-as-patient flatmates suffered the visit of 3 andalusians who were visiting me in Belgrade. Improvising is part of our culture (we are mediterraneans, damn it!) so we  just enjoyed Belgrade (mostly at night) although they (more than me) suffered the heat during the daytime. It was great to meet some friends from Seville after 7 months here and I enjoyed making jokes of everything, speaking fast as hell in Andalusian, know about friends that I left there and how they changed, and, of course, making “botellon”. About this: it was impossible to find ice cubes in Serbia — tip: go where Lana stands at the supermarket and ask the guy at the fish spot for a bag with that ice they use to keep the fish fresh.They will be suprised but you will have some cold drinks.

We had time to do extreme-splaving, devojke-sightseeing, Mtv festival, visiting Novi Sad and Sremski Karlovci, rostilj and swimming in Ada at a bachelor’s party, enjoying traditional music in Skadarlija and feeling like smurfs next to these serbians who are all like bodyguards (the smallest ones) compared to us.

Finally, Molerova is a little more quiet but I am looking forward to meet them again either here, in Venice, or wherever. Next post: my first Serbian weeding. Opusteno dear fans, it’s not mine.